Traditions

Posted by Karen Hessen on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 Under: traditions
St. Patrick's Day is one of my favorite holidays - not because I'm Irish - I'm not. It is because I really enjoy corned beef and cabbage.

I remember when I was a little girl asking my dad what nationality he was. "English and Scotch," he said.

"Then I must be Butterscotch," I answered.

I know Daddy was also "Pennsylvania" Dutch. Mother was German and Jewish. Her cousins say the family is Prussian. I am probably other nationalities I am not aware of. My husband, Doug, Is half Syrian, half French-Canadian.  

I eat corned beef and cabbage because I like it, because it is the thing to do, because it is really easy to make in the crock-pot and because it is tradition. Traditions are important. When my children, Tina and Kurtis, young I looked for ways to make days special and memorable. Special days were celebrated in special ways. For a week before every holiday, I put a special holiday napkin in their school lunch boxes (and their father's work lunch box). This was my way of building anticipation for the special event. A sixteen pack of napkins was just right (with one napkin to spare) for this. 

Doug and I have developed our own set of rituals as empty nesters. We do and say some pretty silly things as we drive back and forth to the coast every week. We still hang on to many of the traditions we established when our children lived at home. When they are with us for the holidays there are certain foods the expect to find on the dining table, activities they want to participate in, ornaments and decorations that need to be in place. We comply with those expectations. Those comforting memories are important for them and us.    

Corned beef and cabbage is so unhealty I dare not indulge in its high-fat salty decadence more than once a year. But it's tradition. That makes it important. 

In : traditions 


Tags: st. patrick's day 
blog comments powered by Disqus

Traditions

Posted by Karen Hessen on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 Under: traditions
St. Patrick's Day is one of my favorite holidays - not because I'm Irish - I'm not. It is because I really enjoy corned beef and cabbage.

I remember when I was a little girl asking my dad what nationality he was. "English and Scotch," he said.

"Then I must be Butterscotch," I answered.

I know Daddy was also "Pennsylvania" Dutch. Mother was German and Jewish. Her cousins say the family is Prussian. I am probably other nationalities I am not aware of. My husband, Doug, Is half Syrian, half French-Canadian.  

I eat corned beef and cabbage because I like it, because it is the thing to do, because it is really easy to make in the crock-pot and because it is tradition. Traditions are important. When my children, Tina and Kurtis, young I looked for ways to make days special and memorable. Special days were celebrated in special ways. For a week before every holiday, I put a special holiday napkin in their school lunch boxes (and their father's work lunch box). This was my way of building anticipation for the special event. A sixteen pack of napkins was just right (with one napkin to spare) for this. 

Doug and I have developed our own set of rituals as empty nesters. We do and say some pretty silly things as we drive back and forth to the coast every week. We still hang on to many of the traditions we established when our children lived at home. When they are with us for the holidays there are certain foods the expect to find on the dining table, activities they want to participate in, ornaments and decorations that need to be in place. We comply with those expectations. Those comforting memories are important for them and us.    

Corned beef and cabbage is so unhealty I dare not indulge in its high-fat salty decadence more than once a year. But it's tradition. That makes it important. 

In : traditions 


Tags: st. patrick's day 
blog comments powered by Disqus

Traditions

Posted by Karen Hessen on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 Under: traditions
St. Patrick's Day is one of my favorite holidays - not because I'm Irish - I'm not. It is because I really enjoy corned beef and cabbage.

I remember when I was a little girl asking my dad what nationality he was. "English and Scotch," he said.

"Then I must be Butterscotch," I answered.

I know Daddy was also "Pennsylvania" Dutch. Mother was German and Jewish. Her cousins say the family is Prussian. I am probably other nationalities I am not aware of. My husband, Doug, Is half Syrian, half French-Canadian.  

I eat corned beef and cabbage because I like it, because it is the thing to do, because it is really easy to make in the crock-pot and because it is tradition. Traditions are important. When my children, Tina and Kurtis, young I looked for ways to make days special and memorable. Special days were celebrated in special ways. For a week before every holiday, I put a special holiday napkin in their school lunch boxes (and their father's work lunch box). This was my way of building anticipation for the special event. A sixteen pack of napkins was just right (with one napkin to spare) for this. 

Doug and I have developed our own set of rituals as empty nesters. We do and say some pretty silly things as we drive back and forth to the coast every week. We still hang on to many of the traditions we established when our children lived at home. When they are with us for the holidays there are certain foods the expect to find on the dining table, activities they want to participate in, ornaments and decorations that need to be in place. We comply with those expectations. Those comforting memories are important for them and us.    

Corned beef and cabbage is so unhealty I dare not indulge in its high-fat salty decadence more than once a year. But it's tradition. That makes it important. 

In : traditions 


Tags: st. patrick's day 
blog comments powered by Disqus

Traditions

Posted by Karen Hessen on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 Under: traditions
St. Patrick's Day is one of my favorite holidays - not because I'm Irish - I'm not. It is because I really enjoy corned beef and cabbage.

I remember when I was a little girl asking my dad what nationality he was. "English and Scotch," he said.

"Then I must be Butterscotch," I answered.

I know Daddy was also "Pennsylvania" Dutch. Mother was German and Jewish. Her cousins say the family is Prussian. I am probably other nationalities I am not aware of. My husband, Doug, Is half Syrian, half French-Canadian.  

I eat corned beef and cabbage because I like it, because it is the thing to do, because it is really easy to make in the crock-pot and because it is tradition. Traditions are important. When my children, Tina and Kurtis, young I looked for ways to make days special and memorable. Special days were celebrated in special ways. For a week before every holiday, I put a special holiday napkin in their school lunch boxes (and their father's work lunch box). This was my way of building anticipation for the special event. A sixteen pack of napkins was just right (with one napkin to spare) for this. 

Doug and I have developed our own set of rituals as empty nesters. We do and say some pretty silly things as we drive back and forth to the coast every week. We still hang on to many of the traditions we established when our children lived at home. When they are with us for the holidays there are certain foods the expect to find on the dining table, activities they want to participate in, ornaments and decorations that need to be in place. We comply with those expectations. Those comforting memories are important for them and us.    

Corned beef and cabbage is so unhealty I dare not indulge in its high-fat salty decadence more than once a year. But it's tradition. That makes it important. 

In : traditions 


Tags: st. patrick's day 
blog comments powered by Disqus

Traditions

Posted by Karen Hessen on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 Under: traditions
St. Patrick's Day is one of my favorite holidays - not because I'm Irish - I'm not. It is because I really enjoy corned beef and cabbage.

I remember when I was a little girl asking my dad what nationality he was. "English and Scotch," he said.

"Then I must be Butterscotch," I answered.

I know Daddy was also "Pennsylvania" Dutch. Mother was German and Jewish. Her cousins say the family is Prussian. I am probably other nationalities I am not aware of. My husband, Doug, Is half Syrian, half French-Canadian.  

I eat corned beef and cabbage because I like it, because it is the thing to do, because it is really easy to make in the crock-pot and because it is tradition. Traditions are important. When my children, Tina and Kurtis, young I looked for ways to make days special and memorable. Special days were celebrated in special ways. For a week before every holiday, I put a special holiday napkin in their school lunch boxes (and their father's work lunch box). This was my way of building anticipation for the special event. A sixteen pack of napkins was just right (with one napkin to spare) for this. 

Doug and I have developed our own set of rituals as empty nesters. We do and say some pretty silly things as we drive back and forth to the coast every week. We still hang on to many of the traditions we established when our children lived at home. When they are with us for the holidays there are certain foods the expect to find on the dining table, activities they want to participate in, ornaments and decorations that need to be in place. We comply with those expectations. Those comforting memories are important for them and us.    

Corned beef and cabbage is so unhealty I dare not indulge in its high-fat salty decadence more than once a year. But it's tradition. That makes it important. 

In : traditions 


Tags: st. patrick's day 
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Make a Free Website with Yola.